Reactions to the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church Bombing

This Sunday, September 15th, marks 50 years since four little girls–Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Wesley — were tragically killed during the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church by the Ku Klux Klan in Birmingham, Alabama. The savagery of their deaths sparked grief, anger, and protests throughout the nation, as evidenced by these items housed in the Eric Steele Wells papers at the Amistad Research Center.

This flyer is for a "National Day of Mourning for the Children of Birmingham"  held in New York City on September 22, 1963.

This flyer is for a “National Day of Mourning for the Children of Birmingham” held in New York City on September 22, 1963.

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This armband was likely worn during the protest advertised in the flyer above.

This armband was likely worn during the protest advertised in the flyer above.

This flyer strikes a more angry tone than the one above and  specifically faults President John F. Kennedy for his lack of response.

This flyer strikes a more angry tone than the one above and specifically faults President John F. Kennedy for his lack of response.

More information on these documents can be found in Amistad’s new digital collection “Print Culture and the Civil Rights Movement, 1950-1980,” which can be viewed through the Louisiana Digital Library.

Posted by Christopher Harter

(Images from the Eric Steele Wells Papers. May not be reproduced without permission.)

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